Resources

Organizations

Media Awareness Network provides resources and supports for everyone interested in media literacy and digital literacy for young people.

The Commercialism in Education Research Unit conducts research, disseminates information, and helps facilitate dialogue between the education community, policy makers, and the public at large about commercial activities in schools.

The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood. is a US based national coalition that seeks to limit the impact of commercial culture on children, and to reclaim childhood from corporate marketers.

The Campaign for Commercial-Free Education is an organization based in Ireland that addresses the increasing advertising and sale of commercial products in schools.

Action Coalition for Media Education seeks to teach media education and skills to children and adults so that they may become more critical consumers of media.

Reports

“Commercialism in Canadian Schools: Who’s Calling the Shots?” Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, 2006.

“An Ounce of Prevention or a Ton or Trouble” Ontario Medical Association, 2005.

“Privatization of Public Education. In Whose Interest?” ETFO, 2005.

“Corporate involvement in Schools” BC Teachers’ Federation, 2000.

“A Promise to Ontario’s Children. Public Education is not for Sale,” ETFO, 2000.

“Commercialism in Ontario Schools: A Research Report” OSSTF, 1995.

Books/Articles

Alex Molnar. School commercialism: from democratic ideal to market commodity. (New York: Routledge, 2005).

Alex Molnar. School Commercialism, Student Health, and the Pressure to do More With Less. Tempe, AZ : Arizona State University. Commercialism in Education Research Unit, 2003.  epicpolicy.org/files/EPSL-0307-105-CERU.doc

Alex Molnar. Giving kids the business: the commercialization of America’s schools. (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1996).

Deron Boyles. The corporate assault on youth: commercialism, exploitation, and the end of innocence. (New York: Peter Lang, 2008).

Deron R. Boyles. Schools or markets? : commercialism, privatization and school-business partnerships. (Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum Associates, 2005).

Deron Boyles. American education and corporations: the free market goes to school. (New York: Garland Pub, 1998).

Geoffry D. White and Flannery C. Hauck. Campus, INC.: corporate power in the ivory tower. (Amhert, NY: Prometheus Books, 2000).

Jane Kenway and Elizabeth Bullen. Consuming children: education, entertainment, advertising. (Philadelphia, PA: Open UP, 2001).

Larry Cuban. The blackboard and the bottom line: why schools can’t be business. (Cambridge: Harvard UP, 2004).

Patricia McAdie. “Private Money for Public Education: Fundraising, Corporate Sponsorships, and Other Entrepreneurial Endeavours.” Perspectives 4:1 (Winter 2004), p.14-16.  www.ctf-fce.ca/e/publications/pd_newsletter/PDVolume4-1English.pdf.

Raffi Cavoukian and Sharna Olfman.  Child Honouring: How to Turn this World Around. To order or learn more, visit: http://www.childhonouring.org/thebook.html

Satu Repo and Erika Shaker. Beyond the bake sale: Exposing schoolhouse commercialism. (Ottawa: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, 2006).

Trevor Norris. Consuming schools: commercialism and the end of politics. (Toronto, University of Toronto Press, 2011).